Choosing a School: Which school offers.....?

Updated   May 26, 2016 |
Choosing a School: Which school offers.....?
Determining which programs are 'must haves' is an important part of choosing the right boarding school for your child.
As you begin to refine your boarding school search, one of the things you will find yourself doing is circling back to find out which schools offer the programs your child wants and needs. Remember: you and your child need to discuss your wants and needs together. That way you will end up with a child who is enthusiastic about going to private school and feels that she has been involved in the process. Unlike the limited options which you will find in most public schools these days, private schools offer a rich array of programs.
 
Foreign languages
 
Mandarin, Spanish, French and Italian are the most common languages offered in private schools. You will find these most often at the high school level but they are increasingly common in the primary grades. If you really want to kick it up a notch, there are several private schools which actually teach everything in French, German and Hebrew, for example. Review the curriculum section of school web sites to determine what language courses are offered. You can find schools quickly by inputting "chinese language" as a search string on this site.
 
What about classical languages such as Latin and Greek? Latin is still to be found on course lists in many schools. Classical Greek is not as common. If a world view is important to you, then review carefully the language component at the schools which interest you. Being fluent in a language or two is increasingly important.
 
Science.Technology.Engineering.Mathematics
 
If STEM is your thing,
. . .read more
Updated   February 02, 2017 |
What Is Your Child Doing This Summer?
Summer can be a time for growth and enrichment. Summer schools and summer camps provide a wide variety of options from which to choose.
When I was a youngster, some time around Victoria Day weekend my parents moved the family  out to a cottage near the village of Chateauguay on the banks of Lac St. Louis. We were there until Labor Day. (In those days school opened after Labor Day.) My brothers and sister and I enjoyed swimming and sailing lessons, the occasional dance as we got older and the usual organized summer activities. Dad worked in Montreal and came out to the cottage in the evenings. Mother stayed at home and supervised us.

When we were bringing up our daughters, it was a bit trickier. We both worked. We had to find things for them to do, both to keep them occupied and to keep them from getting into mischief. A trip, a keyboarding course and even some tutoring, helped make those long summer days in Connecticut move along at a good clip.

Nowadays depending on where you live and the plans you have for your child's education, you will have a variety of options to choose from. Let's look at some of them.

Day Camp
Basically the idea behind a day camp is that you drop your children off in the morning and pick them up in the afternoon. The routine is similar to what you had when school was in session. The advantage to day camp is that it is usually a local operation. If you are lucky enough to have an established day camp in your
. . .read more
Published   February 12, 2012 |
eBooks about Boarding School
Many of the more popular books about boarding school are now available in eReader format. Here's a selection of non-fiction and fiction for your reading pleasure.
 An eReader makes reading a very convenient pastime because you can take dozens of books with you just about anywhere you go. I have identified the popular formats in which you can find the following books about boarding schools.
 

k = Kindle
n = Nook
s = Sony
i = iPad

Most of these titles can also be dowloaded from your local library in eReader format. Happy reading!

Non-fiction

The Best of the Best: Becoming Elite at an American Boarding School by Ruben A. Gaztambide-Fernandez
This is a serious book written by a Harvard education student who spent 2 years embedded in an American boarding school.
(k,n,i)

Black Ice by Lorene Cary
Lorene Cary recounts her experiences as the first African-American female student at prestigious St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire.
(k,n,s,i)

Perfectly Prep: Gender Extremes at a New England Prep School by Sarah A. Chase
The author is a professional anthropologist who examines gender in all its manifestations in boarding school.
(k,n,i)

Pipestone: My Life in an Indian Boarding School by Adam Fortunate Eagle
The author attended an Indian boarding school run by the Federal Government back in the '30s.
(k,n,i)

Preparing For Power: America's Elite Boarding Schools  by Peter W. Cookson Jr, Caroline Hodges Persell
The authors are New York University sociologists. As a result Preparing for Power offers a documented, well-research look at private schools and the how's and why's of their success in positioning leaders of business, the professionals
. . .read more
Updated   May 24, 2016 |
How To Pay for Boarding School
Because paying for boarding school involves so much money, it makes sense to look at all the options available to you.
I remember wondering years ago how we were going to pay for our daughters' private school educations. It was a major expense then. It is still a major expense today. Back then in the 90s boarding school cost $11,000 a year. Because paying for boarding school involves a major part of the income for most of us, let's look at the options which are available to you.
 
You can pay for boarding school in several ways.
 
By check
 
Fees at most schools are payable in advance. You will receive an invoice with your acceptance letter. Half a year's tuition and other fees are due in  the summer, usually in July or early August. The second half of the year's tuition together with other fees is due in December. Payment dates vary from school to school but most expect payment around these times of the year. If you have your child's boarding school expenses allocated already or have sufficient income to cover two substantial payments a year, then paying by check might make sense for you. Effectively you are paying cash for your child's education. Should you expect a cash discount? It never hurts to ask.
Don't forget to budget for the other fees besides tuition. Your tuition invoices will not include items such as tuition insurance, fees for supplies used in special courses, textbooks and supplies as well as your child's athletic equipment. Boarding your daughter's horse is not included in tuition. Neither are music lessons. 
 
Plan on paying for
. . .read more
Updated   June 08, 2016 |
How Private Schools Evolved in the United States
Private schools came first. Then public education took root.
In the infancy of the United States of America, schooling for young people, such as it was, was provided by small, private schools, not public schools. Education in colonial days was quite stratified. Boys learned core subjects such as reading and math. Girls learned the domestic arts. Only white children received an education until slavery was abolished. Very often teachers were well-intentioned men who themselves did not had much formal education. Yes, back then, most teachers were men.

The first private schools were established by the religious missionaries of the Roman Catholic Church in Florida and Louisiana. By all accounts education in the northeastern colonies was better organized in the 18th century than its counterpart in the southern states. Schools such as Boston Latin School were founded in order to teach the Classical
Languages of Latin and Greek. In Manhattan Collegiate School "was established by the Dutch West India Company and the Classis of Amsterdam, the parent ecclesiastical body of the Dutch Reformed Church for the colonists of New Amsterdam." In Washington, DC, Georgetown Preparatory School was "founded in 1789 by America's first Catholic bishop,
Prep is the nation's oldest Jesuit school and the only Jesuit boarding school." In the early part of the 18th century English grammar schools taught more subjects as the need for a more educated populace grew. The latter part of the 18th century saw the development of the genre known as the Academy. Visionaries such as William Penn guided the educational thinking
. . .read more
View Pages:<<Prev  11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20  Next>>
Recent Articles
5 Challenges Parents Face
October 24, 2017
How to handle five basic challenges involved in choosing a boarding school.
Choosing a School: Comparing Schools
September 28, 2017
Use a spreadsheet to develop your initial list of schools. Here's how.
How Can an Educational Consultant Help with a Boarding School Search?
September 28, 2017
Finding the right boarding school for your child is one of the most important and expensive decisions you will ever make.