For Students

Here you’ll gain knowledge about student life at boarding school. User our glossary of terms to learn boarding school jargon, discover the importance of a partnership between school, parent and child, and find great gift ideas for the boarding school graduate.

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Top 5 Reasons To Study Dance At A Boarding School

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Top 5 Reasons To Study Dance At A Boarding School
From meeting world-renowned guest artists to balancing busy rehearsal schedules, students share how boarding school is preparing them to dance professionally.

For dance students with dreams of pursuing their art form professionally, the high school years are a crucial time of preparation. Whether they go to dance camps over the summer or attend competitive dance high schools, many students use this time to take important steps to prepare for higher levels of dance. You may be wondering if you’ve outgrown your local dance studio, or whether you want to continue juggling a hectic schedule that requires you to commute back and forth between your school and your studio. If you’re looking for other options, here are five reasons why you should consider attending a boarding school for dance.

Professional training

The top reason to join a dance boarding high school is the rigor of training you’ll receive. The best dance boarding schools have programs specially designed for students who are interested in dancing in college and/or professionally. The boarding school difference is evident in the caliber of the material you learn, the faculty who work with you, and the fellow students who become your peers.

“My local company was somewhat intense, but I definitely felt that I could be pushed more and I could be challenged more,” says Maxwell Pfluger, a junior at Interlochen Arts Academy majoring in Dance. “I wanted to go to a place that could meet my needs.”

Lindy Sloan, a freshman studying dance at Interlochen, explains another major difference: the opportunity to work

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Preventing Teen Suicide

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Preventing Teen Suicide
Teen suicide is the 3rd largest killer of young adults between the ages of 15-24. You and I can prevent it.

Every year there are reports of high school students taking their own lives. Suicide casts a terrible pall over any school community. It just seems so pointless, so senseless. Yet, had members of the community acted on the signals the young person was most likely sending, that suicide could have been prevented.

The academic work in boarding school is heavy. The pressures to succeed, get into the best college, and not let parents and others down, combined with the reality of adolescent uncertainties, can create a climate for depression. Depression can lead to suicide. However, suicide is preventable.

Suicide is preventable.

Suicide is the 3rd largest killer of young adults between the ages of 15-24. But teen suicide is preventable. Know the warning signs.

The following information from Kids Health tells you what to look for.

"Suicide among teens often happens after a stressful life event, such as problems at school, a breakup with a boyfriend or girlfriend, the death of a loved one, a divorce, or a major family conflict.

Teens who are thinking about suicide might:

  • talk about suicide or death in general
  • give hints that they might not be around anymore
  • talk about feeling hopeless or feeling guilty
  • pull away from friends or family
  • write songs, poems, or letters about death, separation, and loss
  • start giving away treasured possessions to siblings or friends
  • lose the desire to take part in favorite things or activities
  • have trouble concentrating or thinking clearly
  • experience changes in eating or sleeping
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What Alums Have To Say About Their Schools

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What Alums Have To Say About Their Schools
Learning about a school from its website and social media pages is useful as you decide which school to choose. So is hearing what the school's alumni say about their alma mater.

As you work your way through the school search process, you will do your due diligence carefully. A school's website and social media pages are helpful. Visiting schools in which you are interested is very important. Hearing the positive things men and women have to say about the schools which they attended is also instructive.

Here are comments which alumni left on our Facebook page. I have edited them very slightly for capitalization and punctuation. Some alums attended boarding school in the 50s, 60s, and 70s. Others are more recent graduates. Some mention the school they attended. Some do not. No negative reviews? Sure. But you can read those elsewhere on social media.

In their own words.

Best thing is if you want to go. I pressed my parents to send me. They didn’t want me to leave home. We loved each other, and I was an only child. But I wanted to go into the Navy and learn about naval school; so they let me go...Ben

I went for 9th-12th grades. At first, I struggled, but by 12th grade, it was like home to me...Nancy

Outstanding school, wonderful experience. The only regret is I was only able to spend my senior year there...Curt

A wonderful education and, although the boarding rules were strict, I made lifelong friendships!...John

Men of Integrity are hard to find these days - but there were many at Choate - I graduated in 1959....Tim

My opinion is that it is the

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What's It Like At Boarding School?

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What's It Like At Boarding School?
Inevitably at some point while you are looking at boarding schools, your child will ask what it's like living at boarding school. Here are some answers to those questions.

At some point in your boarding school search process, your daughter is going to start asking questions about life at her new school. After all, she has her routine at home and in her current school. But when she goes to her new boarding school, that familiar routine will disappear and be replaced by a new one. Naturally, she will have concerns and questions. Here are some general answers to many of the questions which she will have. Always ask the admissions office at her new school for authoritative answers to your and her specific questions.

This video tells you what one student brought to her boarding school.

Can I use my smartphones?

May I use my smartphone at school? McCallie gives a typical answer in its handbook: "Students are encouraged to use both common courtesy and common sense in the use of technology. " And, by the way, the school handbook is your guide for 95% of your daughter's questions. The rules and regulations contained in the school handbook will be explained thoroughly during orientation. Mailing or receiving calls, texting and sending emails are generally not permitted in classrooms, dining rooms, and other public places.

Can I use my own laptop and tablet?

Boarding schools have Acceptable Use Policies which govern the use of computers at school. These policies will be explained during orientation. Discuss them with your child so that he knows the

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A Year At A Swiss Boarding School

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A Year At A Swiss Boarding School
This article provides an insightful glimpse into the unique experience of attending a boarding school in Switzerland. It explores the enriching academic and cultural environment offered by these institutions, highlighting the benefits of international exposure, rigorous education, and diverse extracurricular activities. The author shares personal anecdotes and testimonials from students, shedding light on the holistic development and lifelong friendships fostered in Swiss boarding schools. Whether considering a boarding school experience or simply curious about this educational pathway, this article offers valuable insights into the world of Swiss boarding schools

Editor's note: In 1957-58 my cousin Peter Denis attended a boarding school in Switzerland. He very kindly answered my questions about his time abroad at school. ~Rob

What prompted your parents to send you to boarding school overseas? Which school did they send you to? How did you get there?

My parents wanted me to improve my French. So they sent me for one year after high school and before university to Ecole Nouvelle de la Suisse Romande, Chailly sur Lausanne, Switzerland. I was the third in a series of five people who had followed such a plan. The idea was to live in the boarding school together with the students doing regular studies. I was enrolled to learn French, which I had already been exposed to over eight years growing up in my hometown of Montreal, Quebec. This Swiss school had a French second language program with dedicated teachers to accommodate students from around the world. The 18 students in my class came from the US, Norway, Sweden, Iran, and Germany, to name just a couple of the countries.

There was no penalty for speaking English, but if you were going to survive, you had to learn French. Once your French was at an acceptable level, you were placed in the regular classes.

I traveled to Le Havre, France, via a Cunard steamship from Montreal. Then I spent five days in Paris

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Recent Articles

10 Things You Must Not Forget When Applying
10 Things You Must Not Forget When Applying
There's a lot involved in selecting the right boarding school. Don't forget these ten important things when you apply.
5 More Founders and the Schools Their Gifts Established
5 More Founders and the Schools Their Gifts Established
Vision. Generosity. High-minded principles. These are the hallmarks of the benefactors of the five schools featured in this article.
5 More Schools and Their Founders
5 More Schools and Their Founders
A private school in its infancy is quite different from the mature community it becomes over time. I wonder what the founders of these five schools would think about them today. I bet they would be very proud of their creations.

School Life