Interviews and Visits

Boarding school visits are an integral part of the admissions process. Despite the rave reviews of friends, family and consultants, you and your child should scope out each school and use your own judgment to determine if he/she will be happy there. This section will help you compile a checklist of things to look for and questions to ask.

View the most popular articles in Interviews and Visits:

International Students: Offsite And Virtual Visits

Updated
|
International Students: Offsite And Virtual Visits
International students who want to attend an American boarding school face several additional steps in the admissions process. More here.

Many students from countries outside the United States want to attend American boarding schools. International students make up about 15% of the student population in American boarding schools, according to The Association of Boarding Schools. It is important to know that international students applying to an American boarding school deal with several additional steps in the admissions process. Because many applicants live at great distances from the schools that they would like to visit, schools have come up with a variety of ways to let parents and potential students experience the school, its community, and its programs. If you live in Asia or Europe, for example, it is not always financially or logistically possible to visit schools in person. Furthermore, while the coronavirus pandemic is active in most of the world, international travel is problematic at best. So, what alternatives exist for those situations? Actually several. Off-campus, school visits come in a couple of flavors.

Admissions Staff Visits Overseas

Many boarding schools send their admissions staff overseas to major cities in countries where they have a substantial applicant pool. Ask for details of visits in your area. While you will have to rely on school videos and web presentations of school life and activities, at least you will have a live person to whom you can pose questions. If English is not your first language, this meeting with school officials will give you a deadline to meet. After all, you are planning to

. . .read more

Boarding School Visits 101

Updated
|
Boarding School Visits 101
Visiting schools allows you to determine if the school is a good fit. During your visit observe and ask questions.

Many parents feel that they know a boarding school because they have spent time on its web site. They 'liked' the school's Facebook page and are following it on Twitter. They also have watched all the YouTube videos the school has posted on its YouTube channel. They and their child are convinced that the school is a good fit for them and their requirements. So why bother actually hopping on a plane, renting a car, booking accommodation and taking all that time to go and visit the school? It goes without saying that you need to visit any school to which you are thinking of sending your child. The school will insist on it because they want to meet you in person whenever possible.

Your educational consultant may have given the schools glowing reports. Your great uncle has always spoken about his years at one of the schools on your shortlist with great fondness. In fact, he has given generously to his alma mater. One of your colleagues in the Boston office has a daughter at another school on your shortlist. She apparently loves her school's equestrian program. But that's their opinion. You and your child need to set foot on each campus on your shortlist, scope each one out and use your own judgment about whether your child will be happy there for three or four years. Here is a list of things to look for and questions to ask.

Things To Look For and Check Out

. . .read more

Interview FAQs

Updated
|
Interview FAQs
An experienced admissions officer tells you make the most of your interview. And more!

I wish that during the 15 years I worked in boarding school admissions,I had kept track of how many students I interviewed. I imagine it’s a greater number than I would even guess. I loved to interview students and have that time to really get to know them -- who they are, what they hope to do, what they are looking for, how they might fit in at my school, and what they bring with them. Sometimes, it was very clear to me that a student was nervous -- perhaps it was their first time in an interview situation. So I would start with, “Are you nervous?” It’s amazing how identifying that fear could somehow easily dissipate it as well. From there, we could talk comfortably with one another and explore what we wanted to explore. Many of the students I work with in boarding school guidance have not been interviewed before this point, which makes sense given their age. I like to guide them beforehand with how they might be more prepared -- both in terms of what they might be asked in an interview and what they might ask, as well as how to make a good impression.

This video looks at Miss Porter's School in Farmington, Connecticut.

What should I wear?

I’m glad you asked! This is one of the first things I ask my students who are planning their visits!

. . .read more

Recent Articles

5 Founders and Their Boarding Schools
5 Founders and Their Boarding Schools
What prompts somebody to start a boarding school? The motives range from idealism to munificence right on through to capitalism. The common thread seems to be ample capital and a vision of what education can do.
A Guide To Using Social Media In Boarding Schools
A Guide To Using Social Media In Boarding Schools
Social media is an essential part of a boarding school's marketing strategy
International Students: Visas and More
March 25, 2024
International Students: Visas and More
In addition to the usual admissions requirements, international students must also obtain a student visa. Here are five tips to help you navigate the admissions process as an international student.