5 Reasons To Choose a Girls' School

Updated August 29, 2017 |
5 Reasons To Choose a Girls' School
There is a body of research which suggests that girls do learn differently from boys. So, if that is the case, maybe you should consider a girls' school for your daughter instead of sending her off to a coed school. Here are some points to ponder.
There is a body of research which suggests that girls do learn differently from boys. So, if that is the case, maybe you should consider a girls school for your daughter instead of sending her off to a coed school. Here are some points to ponder.

1. She will have fewer distractions.

The social static and inherent distractions which occur when you mix adolescent boys and girls together in a coeducational school just do not happen in a girls' school. The social expectations and stereotypes can be broken down. There will be time enough later for the distractions which members of the opposite sex provide. Fewer distractions mean a girl can focus on being herself, finding out who she is, exploring new worlds, lines of thinking and so much more. She can think outside the box with relative impunity. And that is a good thing.

2. She will benefit from teachers who are trained to teach girls.

Teachers in a girls' school are hired because they believe in this kind of education. They understand how girls learn. They provide the kind of nurturing and encouragement a girl needs in order to become all that she can and wants to be. They provide and cite role models which appeal to and encourage girls.

3. She will benefit from a focussed educational and community environment.

When a school does not have to accommodate both sexes, it simplifies the running and organization of the school. The only focus is
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Updated November 24, 2017 |
5 Reasons to Choose a Boys' School
We have been hearing a lot about the benefits of single sex education recently. Here are five reasons why you should consider choosing a boys' school for your son.
Single sex education has a long and distinctive history in the annals of western education. It also has its dark side when you consider that only children of the upper classes were taught how to read and write. When the founders of this country began to grapple with the realities of building and advancing a nation built on democratic principles, they soon realized that education was one of the keys to future success.
 
The Phillips family, for example, invested substantial amounts of money to establish the now famous schools - Andover and Exeter - which bear their name. There were many other visionaries who did the same thing or followed their example as you can see from this list of schools established in the 1700's. Those first schools were single sex schools. Boys' schools. Girls didn't matter back then apparently. 
 
So exactly why would you consider a boys' school for your son in the 21st century?
 
1. Boys learn differently from girls.
 
There is now a recognized body of research which posits that boys do learn differently from girls. Read books like Boys and Girls Learn Differently! by Michael Gurian to understand that line of thinking. Teachers in a boys' school understand how a boy learns and as a result are quite successful in implementing the special teaching techniques required to achieve optimal results.
 
2.
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Updated April 19, 2018 |
5 Common Myths About Military Schools
Military schools seem to go in and out of favor with the general public. Perhaps that has to do with some rather common misconceptions about what military schools are and how they operate. Let's take a look.
Military schools seem to go in and out of favor with the general public. Perhaps that has to do with some rather common misconceptions about what military schools are and how they operate. The truth is that America's military prep schools carry on a proud tradition of academic and personal excellence which has withstood the assaults of negative media attention and changing fashions in education. Let's debunk five common misconceptions about military schools.
 
1. They are retirement outposts for retired officers.
 
Hollywood loves to portray military schools as retirement outposts for disgruntled officers with enormous grudges against just about everything and egos to match. (Think Taps with Timothy Hutton and George C. Scott.) The truth is that most military schools have a headmaster who is styled a commandant or superintendent according to military nomenclature. Becoming an administrator in a military school is a perfectly logical next career step for an officer who has retired from active service usually in his '40's or '50's. Their egos? Most of the them are pretty average. Their job is to run the school, hire the best faculty they can find and manage the finances. That's what any headmaster does.
 
Running any private school these days requires immense amounts of administrative savvy combined with a deft touch for fund-raising and the diplomatic skills of a career diplomat. Being a head of school is a multi-faceted job. Being the head of a military school requires all these skills together with the military experience and background.
 
2. All military schools
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Updated November 24, 2017 |
Teaching in a Boarding School
Teaching or working in a boarding school is quite unlike any job in a day school.
Teaching or working in a boarding school is quite unlike any job in a day school. Why? Because in most schools you will live above the store as it were. Most faculty, deans and heads of school as well as some key support staff such as the admissions and development directors are housed in school accommodations as part of their conditions of employment.
 
Home and School
Boarding schools are self-contained communities. Students and faculty eat together. They share relaxing times watching TV and playing games together. That is because teachers and staff in a boarding school function in loco parentis. They take the place of parents literally and figuratively. They play a powerful role in shaping and guiding their young charges while they are at school. Because the students cannot escape at the end of classes, they cannot avoid the strong influence teachers have on them. This is a major reason many parents send their sons and daughters off to boarding school.

Finding a Job 
How do you find a job in a private school? The best way is to use your network. Alums, colleagues past and present, friends and family constitute the most important group of people who know you and can attest to your suitability, skills and experience for employment better than anybody. They will often be your references simply because they are fans of your work and know you intimately. As far as
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Updated January 10, 2017 |
The Boarding School Glossary
Boarding schools have their own jargon just like any activity or affinity group has.

Boarding schools have their own jargon just like any activity or affinity group has. Here are some of the more common terms and acronyms which you are likely to encounter as you explore boarding schools.

ADD/ADHD

ADHD or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder was previously known as ADD or Attention Deficit Disorder. In all probability, you won't notice signs of ADHD until your child starts school. If he exhibits any symptoms of ADHD, the school will bring it to your attention. The next step is to him evaluated professionally. The syndrome is treatable.  There are hundreds of private schools which have the experienced, professional staff who can work effectively with children who learn differently.  Explore that option thoroughly. This video shows what Forman School offers

ACT

ACT is an acronym for American College Testing program. ACT and the SAT are the two most common college standardized tests of academic readiness for college level studies. Most private schools offer test preparation for the SAT. If you prefer to have your child take the ACT, make sure that you advise the school as soon as you can.

Crew

Crew is the ancient sport of rowing. Rowing in shells is a popular sport in many boarding schools. Typically, crew is offered in the fall and spring. Schools participate in regional and international competitions called regattas. Events such as The Head of the Charles and Henley draw rowers from all over the world. In many ways, Crew

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