5 Common Myths About Military Schools

Updated   January 16, 2018 |
5 Common Myths About Military Schools
Military schools seem to go in and out of favor with the general public. Perhaps that has to do with some rather common misconceptions about what military schools are and how they operate. Let's take a look.
Military schools seem to go in and out of favor with the general public. Perhaps that has to do with some rather common misconceptions about what military schools are and how they operate. The truth is that America's military prep schools carry on a proud tradition of academic and personal excellence which has withstood the assaults of negative media attention and changing fashions in education. Let's debunk five common misconceptions about military schools.
 
1. They are retirement outposts for retired officers.
 
Hollywood loves to portray military schools as retirement outposts for disgruntled officers with enormous grudges against just about everything and egos to match. (Think Taps with Timothy Hutton and George C. Scott.) The truth is that most military schools have a headmaster who is styled a commandant or superintendent according to military nomenclature. Becoming an administrator in a military school is a perfectly logical next career step for an officer who has retired from active service usually in his '40's or '50's. Their egos? Most of the them are pretty average. Their job is to run the school, hire the best faculty they can find and manage the finances. That's what any headmaster does.
 
Running any private school these days requires immense amounts of administrative savvy combined with a deft touch for fund-raising and the diplomatic skills of a career diplomat. Being a head of school is a multi-faceted job. Being the head of a military school requires all these skills together with the military experience and background.
 
2. All military schools
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Updated   November 24, 2017 |
Teaching in a Boarding School
Teaching or working in a boarding school is quite unlike any job in a day school.
Teaching or working in a boarding school is quite unlike any job in a day school. Why? Because in most schools you will live above the store as it were. Most faculty, deans and heads of school as well as some key support staff such as the admissions and development directors are housed in school accommodations as part of their conditions of employment.
 
Home and School
Boarding schools are self-contained communities. Students and faculty eat together. They share relaxing times watching TV and playing games together. That is because teachers and staff in a boarding school function in loco parentis. They take the place of parents literally and figuratively. They play a powerful role in shaping and guiding their young charges while they are at school. Because the students cannot escape at the end of classes, they cannot avoid the strong influence teachers have on them. This is a major reason many parents send their sons and daughters off to boarding school.

Finding a Job 
How do you find a job in a private school? The best way is to use your network. Alums, colleagues past and present, friends and family constitute the most important group of people who know you and can attest to your suitability, skills and experience for employment better than anybody. They will often be your references simply because they are fans of your work and know you intimately. As far as
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Updated   January 10, 2017 |
The Boarding School Glossary
Boarding schools have their own jargon just like any activity or affinity group has.

Boarding schools have their own jargon just like any activity or affinity group has. Here are some of the more common terms and acronyms which you are likely to encounter as you explore boarding schools.

ADD/ADHD

ADHD or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder was previously known as ADD or Attention Deficit Disorder. In all probability, you won't notice signs of ADHD until your child starts school. If he exhibits any symptoms of ADHD, the school will bring it to your attention. The next step is to him evaluated professionally. The syndrome is treatable.  There are hundreds of private schools which have the experienced, professional staff who can work effectively with children who learn differently.  Explore that option thoroughly. This video shows what Forman School offers

ACT

ACT is an acronym for American College Testing program. ACT and the SAT are the two most common college standardized tests of academic readiness for college level studies. Most private schools offer test preparation for the SAT. If you prefer to have your child take the ACT, make sure that you advise the school as soon as you can.

Crew

Crew is the ancient sport of rowing. Rowing in shells is a popular sport in many boarding schools. Typically, crew is offered in the fall and spring. Schools participate in regional and international competitions called regattas. Events such as The Head of the Charles and Henley draw rowers from all over the world. In many ways, Crew

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Updated   July 26, 2017 |
5 Steps for Choosing a Boarding School
Choosing a boarding school involves several steps. We guide you through the process and offer advice and help.

Choosing a boarding or private day school is a process involving several steps. Fortunately for you and me the Internet makes the first step a whole lot easier. Sites like Boarding School Review and Private School Review take the work out of finding schools. Use our Applications Calendar to keep you organized.

Step 1: Identify Schools

Let your imagination and wishes run wild at this stage. Look at any and every school which catches your fancy. Take time to really explore each school's web site. Many of them have excellent video tours. Read what the students have to say about their school. Both Boarding School Review and Private School Review have student comments. Many school web sites have comments as well, although you probably will find that those comments are pretty positive. Boarding School Review and Private School Review do not filter student comments.

Bookmark school web addresses or swipe and paste the URLs into a spreadsheet. That makes the next step in the process really easy. You should end up with a list of 15-20 schools, but don't worry if you have more than that.

And don't worry at this stage about which school is the best one for your child. More about how to deal with that question later.

Step 2: Narrow Your List

This is one of the more time consuming parts of the process of choosing a private school. Why? Because

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Updated   December 27, 2017 |
Using an Educational Consultant
An education consultant knows schools. Like any professional he has vast experience in and knowledge of his chosen field.
Parents considering private or independent schools for the first time can find the situation daunting. If completely new to independent education, one can expend much energy working to learn the vocabulary and ways of independent schools all before focusing on the most important piece of the equation, your student.
 
The school search is akin to a life-size jigsaw puzzle in which the objective is to find the best fit between school and student. No two are alike and dovetailing the talents of school and student is difficult even for the experienced parent.
 
The expertise and services of an educational consultant can help families find the best school for their student.
 
What An Educational Consultant Can Help With
 
Each family's unique setting and student determine the exact role that a consultant plays in the school search.
 
IECA educational consultants are credentialed professionals- members of the Independent Educational Consultants Association (IECA)- who add expertise and independent judgment to a family's school search.
 
A consultant brings clear eyes to a school search. A consultant's perspective helps a family set aside biases and preconceived expectations and notions in favor of clear examination and what is best for the student.
 
 
Using his/her broad vision and expertise, a consultant may shape all or some of a family's school application plan. Most importantly, the consultant can see and think critically about the family, student and school choices, providing guidance driven and shaped by what's best for the student.
 
An educational consultant helps find the best fit of student and
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